WHAT CAN I GROW ON MY ROOFTOP, BALCONY, OR TERRACE

WHAT CAN I GROW ON MY ROOFTOP, BALCONY, OR TERRACE

In an apartment or condo, how do you start a garden? You can grow a variety of vegetables, herbs, perennials, flowers, and vines in containers if you have access to a balcony, rooftop, terrace, or patio.

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TEN QUESTIONS TO ASK ABOUT ROOFTOP OR BALCONY GARDENING

  1. Does your building, if you live in an apartment or condo, allow it? Before you start, double-check your building’s policies.
  2. Can your balcony or rooftop support the extra weight of soil-filled pots? Due to the weight of terra cotta and ceramic pots, you may need to utilise rice pots, plastic or fibreglass containers, or fabric grow bags with light soil mixes.
  3. What method will you use to provide water to your plants? It’s a long way to tote jugs of water if you’re growing on a rooftop. Consider using drip irrigation or pots that water themselves. You could also purchase a watering can that can be easily filled from the bathtub. Will your plants’ surplus water fall on your neighbours below? Be considerate and place saucers or trays under your plants to catch the excess water.
  4. Which plants do you recommend for a balcony or terrace? The most important thing is to choose the proper plants for your location. Don’t squander space on something that isn’t likely to succeed. The most important consideration is the amount of sunlight.

Do you have a balcony that faces south and gets DIRECT sunlight all day? Cacti, many flowers, and most vegetables will thrive there if kept well-watered.
Look for low-light plants like coleus, ferns, impatiens, hostas, and begonias if your balcony faces north or is shadowed by nearby buildings for the most of the day.

Some greens, such as chard, spinach, and lettuce, may thrive with only a half-day of sunlight. Some herbs are able to do so as well, which is fantastic for culinary purposes!
Many people exaggerate their exposure to the sun. Keep in mind that most vegetables require at least 6 to 8 hours of sunlight per day!

Is your balcony or terrace exposed to the elements?

Keep an eye out for any unusual circumstances. The higher you go, the more wind you’ll get, and hot, drying breezes will soon dry out your plants. A lattice or wire trellis that can deflect prevailing winds while also providing support for climbing vines can accomplish double duty. It will also provide a sense of seclusion. You must stay on top of watering because of the drying effect of the wind. Consider using self-watering pots.

Some of your houseplants would enjoy a summer vacation outside. To avoid sun and wind burn on the leaves, gently introduce them to their new place.

How hot is it on your rooftop or balcony?

Heat is a problem when the sun does not reflect off the windows. Lettuce, on the other hand, would simply wilt. If you’re worried about the heat, try tropical plants! A single pot of alocasia, banana, or canna can give the room a jungle feel. Succulents will thrive in this environment! Consider your balcony to be a small outdoor room. If you have the space, set up a table and chairs and relax among the foliage. A burbling fountain or wind chimes might assist give a little of relaxing music to the background noise if your setting is too busy.